Politics, Weather, Photography, and the Dog
Sunday 31 May 2015

The Southampton Arms remains my favorite pub in London, but The Blackbird comes in a close second:

I wound up having breakfast and dinner there yesterday, followed up with drinks at a suburban-feeling club down the block. (Maybe not suburban; more like bridge-and-tunnel.)

Now I'm at Gatwick waiting for my next flight to phase II of this trip: Venice. So far the flight is only delayed 40 minutes. And I may have figured out the Lightroom problem, or at least found a workaround. More on all of this later tonight or tomorrow.

Sunday 31 May 2015 17:55:20 BST (UTC+01:00)  |  | Geography | London | Travel#

I'd have photos to post already, but Adobe Lightroom 6 keeps dying on my Surface. It works when I install it, but the next time I try to open it, even after a reboot, it gets to the splash screen and stops loading.

I hope to resolve this later today.

Sunday 31 May 2015 12:33:56 BST (UTC+01:00)  |  | Photography | Software#
Friday 29 May 2015

Traveling today, so no postings until much later. Possibly tomorrow.

Photos too. I did a field-test of my Surface, and everything worked, once I re-installed Lightroom. I hope I don't have to do that again.

Friday 29 May 2015 07:52:46 CDT (UTC-05:00)  |  | Travel#
Thursday 28 May 2015

You know, it sucks to be Greece right now, and Germany is really screwing itself by not negotiating with them. But as an American tourist about to visit the continent, this is a nice thing to see (particularly after the bump earlier in the month):

This doesn't completely suck, either (I'm stopping in London on the way):

Thursday 28 May 2015 15:55:23 CDT (UTC-05:00)  |  | Geography | London | World | Travel#

When I put dog food in little baggies and pull out my suitcase, Parker sulks:

Sorry, buddy.

Thursday 28 May 2015 07:58:01 CDT (UTC-05:00)  |  | Parker#
Wednesday 27 May 2015

As I'm still getting to know Lightroom 6 and its HDR feature, I wanted to revisit this one from 2013:

Here's the refresh. I think it's a more subtle result, and looks more like what I actually saw in Hampstead Heath:

On my next trip (in two days), I'll probably take a lot more HDR-ready images. The Canon 7D Mark II does a sort-of draft HDR in-camera, with a number of options for generating the raw files that my old camera didn't have. I'm looking forward to the results.

Wednesday 27 May 2015 09:57:23 CDT (UTC-05:00)  |  | London | Photography#

Via reader EB, a Chicago Magazine article from 1980 wonders where the gentrification really is (because it was 20 years in the future):

Thus it was that Yuppies began regentrifying poverty areas along the lakefront, such as Lincoln Park, Old Town, New Town, Lakeview, and Uptown. As population expert Pierre de Vise has noted, these singles are able to establish beachheads in “the buffer zones separating the Gold Coast from the slum” because the singles are less concerned with poor schools and street crime than middle-class families. The families, which had been fleeing to the suburbs since about 1950, continued to flee—would you send your child to a Chicago public school? Between 1970 and 1975 alone, the number of white households in Chicago with children dropped from 488,000 to 447,000, a loss of 41,000 households and the biggest drop in any category of the Census Bureau’s housing survey. Nevertheless, the arrival of the Yuppies was the first spontaneous evidence of new urban life in 30 years, and so the “urban renaissance” was hastily proclaimed.

But the word “renaissance” usually implies a cultural rebirth pervading all of society. The renaissance in Chicago has, in fact, been limited to a few oases. Of the 30,000 new housing units constructed in Chicago between 1970 and 1975, nearly half are concentrated in just 28 of the city’s 840 census tracts; as you might have guessed, all 28 of those tracts are on or near the lakefront.

Despite the frantic real-estate activity along the lakefront today, a 1975 study by Pierre de Vise turned up entire neighborhoods—mostly in black ghettos or blue-collar areas—where there hadn’t been a single conventional house sale all year; virtually all of the conventional mortgage sales, de Vise found, were restricted to the North and Northwest sides, the Far Southwest Side, and lakefront houses and condominiums.

Only, the hated Yuppies moving into those communities actually did reduce crime and improve schools, but also drove out minorities and the poor. Chicago today would be unrecognizable to people from 1980. In fact, people in my own family who moved away from Chicago in the 1970s cannot comprehend $500,000 condos at Wells and Division, nor walking alone through Oz Park after dark. And they certainly would never send a child to Lincoln Park High School.

We've got a long way to go to have a truly sustainable city, but we're on the right track (despite pensions). I'm glad to be living here now.

Wednesday 27 May 2015 09:39:49 CDT (UTC-05:00)  |  | Chicago | Geography | US#
Tuesday 26 May 2015

I've supported Kickstarter campaigns, including Exploding Kittens (shipping now!). Sometimes the campaigns explode; but sometimes, they fail miserably:

“There's a chasm between an idea, a design and a business which Kickstarter, Indiegogo and others really in some ways ignore,” says Michael Marasco, director of Northwestern University's Farley Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation. “The reality is that there are tons of patents out there, tons of designs out there that have never become products.”

Kickstarter backers ostensibly understand this risk. The platform publicizes the fact that it is not a store but rather a way for people to work together to make things, so the specter of failure always lurks. Kickstarter participants do not own a stake in the companies they back. But that doesn't prevent them from becoming emotionally invested—and as delays mount, enthusiasm can morph into anger.

John Campbell, an artist in Wicker Park, raised $51,000 in 2012 for a comic book, “Sad Pictures for Children,” and shipped about 800 to backers. But in February 2014, after running out of money to send the rest, he grew so frustrated that he began lighting some of the remaining copies on fire—and posted video of the burning books to Kickstarter.

Tuesday 26 May 2015 14:16:45 CDT (UTC-05:00)  |  | Business#
Tuesday 26 May 2015 14:02:18 CDT (UTC-05:00)  |  | Kitchen Sink#
Monday 25 May 2015

With the Inner Drive Technology World Headquarters move only 21 days from now, this was bound to happen:

Also in the next three weeks is a big vacation. So, you know, no stress...

Monday 25 May 2015 08:35:52 CDT (UTC-05:00)  |  | Kitchen Sink | Travel#
Friday 22 May 2015

Less than 24 hours ago, I put my old camera on Craigslist: $500 for the body, two old lenses, the battery pack and charger, and a 32 GB CF card.

This afternoon, someone stopped by my office, played with the camera for five minutes, handed me $450 in cash, and that was it.

Thank you, Craig. That was remarkably painless.

Friday 22 May 2015 17:07:28 CDT (UTC-05:00)  |  | Photography | Business#
Thursday 21 May 2015

I'm not sure this produced a significantly different photo, but I've done another quick HDR image with Lightroom. First, the basic shot, posted the day after my visit to the Joint Security Area on the North-South Korean border:

Here's the first HDR attempt posted a week later:

And here's one with Lightroom 6:

The second HDRI used different source images, but only from a few seconds later. Are they significantly different? Maybe insignificantly? I must ponder...

Thursday 21 May 2015 13:57:36 CDT (UTC-05:00)  |  | Geography | Photography#

WBEZ's Curious City has the story:

Every town that folded into Chicago, from Lake View to Hyde Park, had its own system for naming and numbering streets. Some towns counted out addresses starting from the Chicago River, while others started from Lake Michigan. Some placed even numbers on the north side of the street, others put them on the south. Some even let developers choose their own street names or numbers if there wasn’t a lot of local opposition.

Edward Paul Brennan was a delivery boy for his father’s grocery store, and later a bill collector for the music company Lyon & Healy. He was so frustrated with the chaos of Chicago’s address system that in 1901 he came up with his own. But it would take him years to get it implemented.

Beginning in the 1890s he started a scrapbook, collecting newspaper articles about problems with city navigation or delays due to address confusion. Articles had headlines like “Streets in a Tangle. Visitors Lost.” One report tells about a doctor who couldn’t find a patient during a house call emergency.

Today, Chicago addresses increase by 100 per block, 800 per mile. (Miles are significant because of the way land is surveyed in Illinois.) It's an easily-understood system that makes it hard to get lost in the city.

Thursday 21 May 2015 10:02:04 CDT (UTC-05:00)  |  | Chicago | Geography#
Search
On this page....
The Blackbird
Lightroom 6 / Surface compatibility
On the road again
Things you want to see the day before going to Europe
Not happy with me
Revisiting another HDR photo
The beginnings of Chicago's urban renaissance
When a Kickstarter dies
Robert DeNiro addresses Tisch graduates
It begins...
Awed by the power of Craigslist
More HDR fun with Lightroom
How did Chicago get its street number system?
Countdowns
The Daily Parker +3487d 15h 31m
Italy +3d 17h 32m
IDTWHQ move 13d 06h 42m
Parker's 9th birthday 13d 21h 42m
My next birthday 95d 01h 47m
Categories
Aviation (366) Baseball (110) Best Bars (10) Biking (46) Chicago (1000) Cubs (199) Duke (134) Geography (371) Higher Ground (5) Jokes (284) Kitchen Sink (711) London (73) Parker (204) Daily (204) Photography (158) Politics (307) US (1148) World (287) Raleigh (21) Readings (8) Religion (68) San Francisco (94) Software (218) Blogs (83) Business (251) Cloud (91) Cool links (152) Security (105) Travel (263) Weather (755) Astronomy (94) Windows Azure (64) Work (101) Writing (15)
Links
Archive
<June 2015>
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
31123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
2829301234
567891011
Full archive
Blogroll
About
David Braverman and Parker
David Braverman is the Chief Technology Officer of Holden International in Chicago, and the creator of Weather Now. Parker is the most adorable dog on the planet, 80% of the time.
Legal
All content Copyright ©2015 David Braverman.
Creative Commons License
The Daily Parker by David Braverman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License, excluding photographs, which may not be republished unless otherwise noted.
Admin Login
Sign In
Blog Stats
Total Posts: 4823
This Year: 209
This Month: 0
This Week: 2
Comments: 0